Truth Matters


cat-fight-1411617-mRecently on Facebook and over at Speculative Faith I’ve been discussing with others the movie Noah. It’s been interesting, and lots of fur has been flying all over the Internet as a result of various reviews.

At the same time, I learned today that opinion writer Rachel Held Evans, who previously identified as an evangelical though her views ran more nearly in line with “progressive Christians,” has decided to remove herself from the evangelical table. Her decision came as a result of the World Vision decision to re-instate their former employment policy describing marriage as between a man and a woman.

In both these diverse issues, there’s one thing in common–God’s Word.

In the discussions about Noah the movie, one line of thinking has dealt with the interpretation of storytelling. Do facts and details have to be true if the over arching theme is true? Isn’t the emotional experience of the theme more important? Shouldn’t readers or viewers have an experience with the story?

Interestingly, I had a discussion with several Progressives over at Mike Duran’s site some while ago, and their take on the Bible was exactly the same. The Bible is true, they believe, but whether the particulars are true isn’t important. It’s the meaning of the narrative and the poetry and the prophecy that is true irrespective of the how, who, when, and where.

This idea of Big Truth built on fables, myth, lore, or perhaps history, which some people determine the Bible to be, seems to me to be a slippery slope–perhaps the same slippery slope Rachel Held Evans has slid down.

Toward the end of his review at Spec Faith, Austin Gunderson said about Noah the movie, “It diminishes one truth to expand upon another.”

I get that in fiction–well, in nonfiction, too–it’s not possible to tell the whole Truth in a single work. I don’t think that telling some truth and not mentioning the rest is the same as distorting or diminishing one truth in order to make clear another truth.

Hence, my belief is that Noah, by diminishing God’s nature as a Person who communicates with the people He created, altered Truth. Leaving out the details that God gave Noah explicit instructions about building the ark, told him how many of each animal to take, and took it upon Himself to seal the door, shows God in a completely different light than He actually is.

Rachel Held Evans handles Scripture in a similar way it would seem. For her the Greater Truth is care and concern for people regardless of any diminishing of God’s holiness or authority. God does, in fact, care for the lost. Scripture says, While we were yet sinners, Christ died for us (Rom. 5:8). He declares that the second most important command is to love our neighbor as ourselves.

But emphasis on that Truth should not diminish the Truth that the first command is to love God with all we are. Jesus explains that to love Him means to obey Him. Meaning, we don’t get to pick and choose which commands we will follow and which we will ignore.

It’s not OK to follow the world by condoning sin in the name of compassion. That’s diminishing one Truth in the attempt to expand another.

In short, Truth matters. The Grand Truth delivered through the meta narrative of the Bible and the Specific Truth delivered in each word the Holy Spirit inspired.

On Being Silenced


Speak no evil monkeyThere’s apparently a brouhaha among certain elements of those professing Christianity that started on Twitter as a result of a conference with an overwhelming number of male speakers. One person evidently pointed this out, and an exchange of Tweets ensued. Next came blog posts.

I’m uninformed about the particulars. However, a familiar claim jumped out at me–one that surfaced in the discussion I found myself in a month or so ago. The common thread is that people who take a different approach, who counsel unity, who disagree are trying to silence criticism.

Here are the lines that jumped out at me:

I don’t like being divisive. Believe me.

But I don’t like being silenced either. (Emphasis in the original)

So “don’t try to silence me” appears to be the current trump card in disagreements. The troubling thing to me is that those calling for unity are being lumped in with those “trying to silence people.”

The implication is that a call for unity requires the person raising a criticism to back down, and therefore to be quiet.

There is the possibility that this is precisely what the critics need to do. I’m astounded when I read about organizational infighting as if it is a power struggle. Here’s an example:

The reality is, some folks benefit from the status quo, and it is in their best interest to characterize every challenge to the status quo as wholly negative and a threat to Christian unity. This makes it difficult for those who perceive inequity within the status quo to challenge it without being labeled as troublemakers out to make Jesus look bad.

In other words, the advantage goes to the powerful because things rarely change without friction. (Excerpt from “On being ‘divisive’. . .”)

Status quo. Challenge. Threat. Inequity. Powerful. Are we talking about a government, a business? Since when is the Church all about getting into have and have-not camps? Since when are we looking at the Body of Christ as specialty groups, one in a “position of privilege” and another “speaking from the margins”?

Let’s say for the sake of argument that these groups exist. What does God’s Word say about quarrels and conflicts that might arise? James takes the hardest line:

What is the source of quarrels and conflicts among you? Is not the source your pleasures that wage war in your members? You lust and do not have; so you commit murder. You are envious and cannot obtain; so you fight and quarrel. You do not have because you do not ask. (4:1-2)

There are all kinds of other passages in the New Testament that address the issue of Christians and how we are to treat one another (with love), how we are to view one another (as one body–not as Jews versus Greeks, circumcised versus uncircumcised, male versus female, rich versus poor), and what it takes to accomplish this goal (the humility of Christ).

I want to stress what James said, though: You do not have because you do not ask.

Would our good God not care about inequity within the body of believers? We know He does because Acts records an inequity in the church with certain widows (the most marginalized members of that society) being forgotten. The Church leadership dealt with the problem, so we know this was not an insignificant matter. God cared for those widows and He cared for us in the 21st century to have the example of how the 1st century church handled the situation.

So why, I wonder, are those who are concerned about the number of women speakers at a host of Christian conferences not content to ask? Primarily I believe we should be asking God to change any problems in the Church. He cares for His temple of living stones being built up, founded on the choice and precious cornerstone of His Son.

Will God ignore us if we ask?

James again:

You ask and do not receive, because you ask with wrong motives, so that you may spend it on your pleasures. (4:3)

So yes, it’s possible prayer for women to be put in higher profile positions within the Church might not be answered. I have no way of knowing what motive women have who think it is better to hear a woman speaker than it is to hear a man. I have no way of knowing if they have brought their concerns before God in prayer.

I do know that we are to speak the truth in love, not in snarky tweets. And it is the way we speak to each other, not our agreement on every point, that is to set us apart from the rest of the world.

Published in: on November 14, 2013 at 6:56 pm  Comments Off on On Being Silenced  
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Heaven And Hell And The Book By Rob Bell


Love Wins: Heaven, Hell and the Fate of Every Person Who Has Ever Lived by Rob Bell the founding pastor of the Mars Hills Bible Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan, has created a stir. Or should I say, the book’s promotional video has. Lines are being drawn, camps are being set up, all in the name of God. All we’re missing is bloodshed. People supporting Pastor Bell are sadly shaking their heads at the nay-sayers and vice versa.

One blogger at least, Rachel Held Evans, realizes that the issue is bigger than this particular controversy or the personalities involved. You see, people want to know about heaven … and to a lesser degree, about hell. I realized that again yesterday when I scanned the NY Times best-seller list and saw another “heaven” book ensconced in the top ten.

This should be no surprise. The Baby Boomers are growing old, and death has been known to follow aging. What comes after death? so many want to know.

Now, along comes Rob Bell’s book, with a subtitle that brings the questions to the surface and a promotion video slanted toward universalism, and we have a controversy over a topic virtually everyone wants to know about.

The thing that stands out most to me is what seems to be missing in Pastor Bell’s promotion. Here’s part of the transcript as provided by Kevin DeYoung in his post “Two Thoughts on the Rob Bell Brouhaha”

Will only a few select people make it to heaven? And will billions and billions of people burn forever in hell? And if that’s the case, how do you become one of the few? Is it what you believe or what you say or what you do or who you know or something that happens in your heart? Or do you need to be initiated or take a class or converted or being born again? How does one become one of these few?

The focus of his compassion seems to stem from the physical pain and suffering ascribed to hell, but the greatest loss is actually God. He is love and people going to hell will be separated from love. He is holy, and they will have no part in holiness. He is just and they will have nothing to do with justice.

Their torment will be self-inflicted to a degree, just as Scripture describes it.

Can a throne of destruction be allied with You,
One which devises mischief by decree?
They band themselves together against the life of the righteous
And condemn the innocent to death.
But the LORD has been my stronghold,
And my God the rock of my refuge.
He has brought back their wickedness upon them
And will destroy them in their evil;
The LORD our God will destroy them.
– Psalm 94:23 (emphasis mine)

Granted, this Psalm is referring to God’s intervention in this life, but I don’t see why He won’t work in a similar way in the judgment. Yes, He will punish. But in a place without His restraining hand, where wickedness is unchecked, how much worse will that punishment be?

I’m reminded of what Corrie ten Boom wrote about her imprisonment at the hands of the Nazis during World War II. The conditions were deplorable, but when her sister Betsy showed the love of Christ, she brought peace where chaos had reigned.

Hell will know no peace.

How can we accuse God of wrong doing when His absence alone would make a place hell? And who is it that suffers His absence? The wicked who reject Him.

Last point: how can anyone accuse Omniscience of getting it wrong that those He declares to be wicked, actually are?

Published in: on March 1, 2011 at 5:34 pm  Comments (10)  
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