He Is Alive!


Sunday we’ll celebrate Easter. Those adventurous enough to awake in the waning hours of night and find their way to a Sunrise service actually commemorate the moment of discovery.

Grieving women, determined to provide Jesus with a proper burial, made their way to the tomb where they’d seen His body laid. They brought with them the necessary spices to preserve His corpse, but the tomb had been closed with a stone too big for them to maneuver.

According to Mark’s account this difficulty hadn’t dawned on them before they set out. Otherwise they could have asked a couple of the disciples to accompany them. Interestingly, they didn’t decide to turn back once they realized they couldn’t get into the tomb with that boulder blocking the entrance. Perhaps they kept going instead of searching for a few strong men because they knew a Roman guard had been stationed there. Were they hoping to find mercy from their persecutors?

No telling what kept them going, but their persistence paid off. When they got to the tomb, the stone was already rolled aside. That’s when they first heard the truth: Jesus isn’t in the tomb because He’s alive. Not, mysteriously missing. Alive!

While they were perplexed about this, behold, two men suddenly stood near them in dazzling clothing; and as the women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, the men said to them, “Why do you seek the living One among the dead? He is not here, but He has risen. Remember how He spoke to you while He was still in Galilee, saying that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.” (Luke 24:4-7)

I love this announcement. It carries a subtle rebuke—as if the angels are saying, Hel-lo! Weren’t you paying attention? He told you He’d be out of here in three days. And you’re still looking for Him in this tomb? Why? Why would you do that?

The_Empty_Tomb004I can only imagine the confusion those women felt. The shock at not finding His body, the questioning—yes they remembered His words; could it be true? Had He meant literally “rise from the dead”? The flicker of hope fanning ever brighter. And at last they went to report what they’d seen to the disciples.

Two at least, Peter and John, went to see for themselves. But seeing, they still didn’t totally get it. They recognized that the women had told the truth—the tomb was open and there was no body, even though the grave wrappings were still in place. It was as if His body had evaporated. Today we might think it looked as if His body had been transported elsewhere, leaving the grave wrappings undisturbed.

All they knew was that there was no explanation—apart from the one Jesus had given them repeatedly and with increased frequency: He had risen from the dead. He was alive.

The Living Christ makes Christianity unique among all other religions. And wonderfully, the Bible tells us His resurrection is emblematic of our own resurrection to new life: “and He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead” (Col. 1:18b).

Paul clarified this in his first letter to the church in Corinth. Apparently some people were teaching that there was no resurrection. Paul said Christ’s resurrection proved this to be false:

20 But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who are asleep. 21 For since by a man came death, by a man also came the resurrection of the dead. 22 For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ all will be made alive. 23 But each in his own order: Christ the first fruits, after that those who are Christ’s at His coming (1 Cor. 15:20-23)

So, yes, come Easter morning, celebrate because Jesus has risen; He has risen indeed! He is alive!

This post first appeared here in March 2013.

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Published in: on March 31, 2018 at 4:08 pm  Comments Off on He Is Alive!  
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Spring


Here in SoCal, winter came late this year. We had one devastating rain storm in January, and then nothing until March. Since the storms have come, we’ve had a series of them one after the other. Never much rain, but definitely cooler temperatures.

And now it’s likely over. After tomorrow, there’s just no rain on the horizon. Of course we could break the mold and have rain in April, but that would be a bit shocking.

Elsewhere in our country, people are enjoying a final snow day, but they, too, realize, spring is just around the corner. The signs are there. The old growth is sporting new, birds are singing, squirrels are cavorting from tree to tree, buds are blossoming.

Spring is the greatest testimony to new life that we can possibly imagine.

New life is precisely what Easter celebrates, only on a much greater scale—new life that is everlasting. New life that goes beyond the physical, new life that changes things now and changes things forever after.

Interesting that the Bible uses the metaphor of a seed “dying” only to bring new life up from the soil. That’s the picture of resurrection life, the very thing Jesus experienced so that we would know what’s going to take place in the future.

Because a lot of the fear or dread of dying comes from not knowing.

Jesus simply erased that by showing up so we know. When, that’s still in question. But the fact of the new life, that’s as certain as the dawn.

So is the new life that we enjoy now as people set free from the Law, from guilt, and from slavery to sin. The new life now is just as much a part of Easter as the new life then. It’s not as dramatic, perhaps, though it might be.

When someone has been abusive and no longer is, or addicted and is suddenly set free, their new lives are pretty dramatic and notable. A pastor here in SoCal who I hear from time to time on the radio, admits that his life was headed in the wrong direction when he was a young man. He did any number of things he isn’t proud of, but today he’s the teaching pastor of a church that has as its mission, “To proclaim to the city of Los Angeles that ‘there’s God in heaven who loves you.’ ”

That’s new life in the here and now.

No, Christians don’t suddenly become perfect. But when we blow it, when we revert to the old life, we have God’s love and forgiveness and power through His Spirit so that we can change.

The movie I Can Only Imagine is the true account of another man whose life was a disaster. He wasn’t just heading the wrong way, he was already there. Abusive to his wife and son, to the point that she up and left him, his hard heart only turned harder. Until he met Christ.

Then this “monster” became the kind of man his son wanted to become.

Here’s the movie trailer, which gives an idea of the transformation that took place.

That’s what new life looks like in the here and now. Young or old, rich or poor, male or female, any ethnicity or skin color or language in all the world, and God can transform what we were to the likeness of His Son.

Jesus was the one who welcomed children, who fed the hungry, who invited the outcasts to join him, touched the diseased, brought health and healing to the “crazy man,” praised people the religious folk didn’t even notice. Why? Because just like His Father, He loves the world.

So He wants to bring new life. On a grand scale. On an eternal scale.

He did so by giving up His life so we might be declared free, clean, new.

Published in: on March 21, 2018 at 5:58 pm  Comments (1)  
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A Living Hope


toddler-in-leaves-631626-mThe Apostle Peter starts his first letter, after his greeting, with a statement about God. First he identifies Him as “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,” then as the One “who has caused us to be born again to a living hope” (1 Peter 1:2, emphasis added).

Hope is a noun but not something I usually think of as animate. So what does Peter mean, “living hope”? Some commentary anchors this phrase in what Peter says next: our living hope comes “through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.”

Almost this makes it sound as if Jesus is our hope! 😉

Such an idea fits with other passages in Scripture. Jeremiah refers to the LORD as “the hope of Israel (17:13a) and Paul referred to Jesus “our hope” (1 Tim. 1:1). But if this living hope comes through Christ’s resurrection, is He the object as well as the means? Through Jesus we have Jesus? There’s truth in that statement.

But what’s the “living” part? First, Jesus is alive. We don’t hope in a man who lived and died, merely leaving us an example to follow. Yes, Jesus is that, but He is a living example, a living Savior, a living Lord.

Second, our hope has a purpose: we hope as a means “to obtain an inheritance which is imperishable and undefiled and will not fade away, reserved in heaven for you” (1 Peter 1:5).

All those describers indicate life. Something that is imperishable is alive, something undefiled will not spoil, something that will not fade away is permanent, something reserved in heaven is everlasting.

Backtracking a bit, this living hope is something we have because God “who according to His great mercy has caused us to be born again to a living hope.”

Birth yields life. Until God causes us to be born again, we are dead in our sins. When He causes us to be born again, we are alive in a new way. Old things have passed away. New things have taken their place.

An analogy of this new life might be the change that occurs when a baby learns to crawl, then walk. His life used to consist of lying on his back watching shifting shapes pass by and listening to the music or voices of those nearby. When he was hungry, he cried; when thirsty, he cried; when wet or poopy, he cried; when tired, he cried; when bored, he cried. He was about as dead as any living thing can be.

But one day, he learned to crawl, then to walk. Slowly his world expanded and he came alive to all that this world has to offer. Now he could follow his mom and dad and imitate them. He could discover beauty and kindness and faithfulness and love. He could aspire to more than watching the world go by and listening to the sounds around him. He could now do the things he saw his parents do.

In a nutshell, that’s what our living hope, our new life in Christ is all about. Colossians 3 says we have “laid aside the old self with its evil practices and have put on the new self who is being renewed to a true knowledge according to the image of the one who created him.”

In other words, our new birth enables us to walk so we can be like God, our Creator. The old self, the dead self, has no hope of becoming like Christ. It’s dead. It doesn’t become anything. Only a living being, someone born again, can become like God’s Son.

Our living hope is Jesus, the one who is the means by which we are born again and the one in whose image we’re being recreated. That’s now, and it’s an imperishable inheritance as well. Living and everlasting.

Published in: on December 5, 2014 at 7:07 pm  Comments (1)  
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He Is Alive


The_Empty_Tomb004Sunday we’ll celebrate Easter. Those adventurous enough to awake in the waning hours of night and find their way to a Sunrise service actually commemorate the moment of discovery.

Grieving women, determined to provide Jesus with a proper burial, made their way to the tomb where they’d seen His body laid. They brought with them the necessary spices to preserve His corpse, but the tomb had been closed with a stone too big for them to maneuver.

According to Mark’s account this difficulty hadn’t dawned on them before they set out. Otherwise they could have asked a couple of the disciples to accompany them. Interestingly, they didn’t decide to turn back once they realized they couldn’t get into the tomb with that boulder blocking the entrance. Perhaps they kept going instead of searching for a few strong men because they knew a Roman guard had been stationed there. Were they hoping to find mercy from their persecutors?

No telling what kept them going, but their persistence paid off. When they got to the tomb, the stone was already rolled aside. That’s when they first heard the truth: Jesus isn’t in the tomb because He’s alive. Not, mysteriously missing. Alive!

While they were perplexed about this, behold, two men suddenly stood near them in dazzling clothing; and as the women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, the men said to them, “Why do you seek the living One among the dead? He is not here, but He has risen. Remember how He spoke to you while He was still in Galilee, saying that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.” (Luke 24:4-7)

I love this announcement. It carries a subtle rebuke–as if the angels are saying, Hel-lo! Weren’t you paying attention? He told you He’d be out of here in three days. And you’re still looking for Him in this tomb? Why? Why would you do that?

I can only imagine the confusion those women felt. The shock at not finding His body, the questioning–yes they remembered His words; could it be true? Had He meant literally “rise from the dead”? The flicker of hope fanning ever brighter. And at last they went to report what they’d seen to the disciples.

Two at least, Peter and John, went to see for themselves. But seeing, they still didn’t totally get it. They recognized that the women had told the truth–the tomb was open and there was no body, even though the grave wrappings were still in place. It was as if His body had evaporated. Today we might think it looked as if His body had been transported elsewhere, leaving the grave wrappings undisturbed.

All they knew was that there was no explanation–apart from the one Jesus had given them repeatedly and with increased frequency: He had risen from the dead. He was alive.

The Living Christ makes Christianity unique among all other religions. And wonderfully, the Bible tells us His resurrection is emblematic of our own resurrection to new life: “and He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead” (Col. 1:18b).

Paul clarified this in his first letter to the church in Corinth. Apparently some people were teaching that there was no resurrection. Paul said Christ’s resurrection proved this to be false:

20 But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who are asleep. 21 For since by a man came death, by a man also came the resurrection of the dead. 22 For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ all will be made alive. 23 But each in his own order: Christ the first fruits, after that those who are Christ’s at His coming (1 Cor. 15:20-23)

So, yes, come Easter morning, celebrate because Jesus has risen; He has risen indeed! He is alive!

Published in: on March 29, 2013 at 6:56 pm  Comments (1)  
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