Reprise: Does God Care Who Wins The NCAA Tournament?


NCAA_tournamentI don’t usually reprise an article that I first published so recently (March 2015), but I didn’t think I had anything to add to what I wrote two years ago about the cultural phenomenon known as March Madness, which is the NCAA Men’s Division I basketball tournament. So here, with only the smallest revision, is that post again.

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Even the person least into sports here in the US is likely to know that the top division in men’s basketball is holding their tournament to determine the 2017 champion. We’ve fondly dubbed this time each year, March Madness.

It’s not quite as mad as it used to be. Yes, there are still upsets which scrambles everyone’s game by game predictions, but one TV network used to cover the games so there were split screens and much jumping from scheduled game to updates and even the endings of close games. The games, of course, start during the week, so working people were taping the games they most wanted to see and trying to avoid hearing final scores.

Things have changed. Cable TV is now part of the mix. All games can be viewed by whoever has that service. Or has the Internet and enough data minutes to see the games they can’t otherwise get. In other words, there’s far less scrambling, far less madness connected with seeing the games.

Still, many people put a lot into picking winners and following the games to see how well they’re doing and what chance they have of winning office pools or more. In other words, a lot of people are interested in what a bunch of college students are doing the three weeks of the tournament.

Factor in interested parties which include fellow students at the competing universities, friends and family, alumni, teachers past and present, people who live in the communities where the different schools are located. In other words, beneath the layer of unattached fans, you have a layer of attached fans.

At the core, of course, are those intimately involved with the basketball programs—players, coaches, athletic directors, trainers, cheerleaders, ball boys, those who work the games, scorekeepers, timers. People involved are invested, some to a greater degree than others.

In all this, does God care who wins the NCAA men’s basketball championship?

That question comes to mind in part because I spent thirty years as a coach—of various middle school, and then high school, girls sports teams, including basketball. Since I worked at Christian schools, we always prayed together as a team, but most often we were playing against other Christian schools which also prayed as a team.

Early on I confronted the dilemma—could I expect God to hear our prayers and not theirs if we both prayed to win the game? And if we prayed to win and yet lost, did that mean there was sin in the camp, that God was somehow displeased with us, that we had more to learn spiritually before He would reward us with a championship?

In other words, I wrestled with the issue of praying for a victory in a basketball game. In the end, I decided not to pray for wins.

The temptation is to conclude that God simply doesn’t care. Whether team A or team B wins certainly doesn’t change who He is or what He wants to accomplish. But I believe God cares about games because He cares about us.

In fact, one of the reasons I loved coaching so much was that I viewed sports as a microcosm of life. During a season of basketball, a team faces in miniature many of the things that they’ll have to deal with on a larger scope later on: adversity, success, hard work, togetherness, failure, discipline, teamwork, obedience, response to injustice, doing your best, bouncing back from not doing your best, and more.

Don’t get me wrong. Winning is sweet. But there’s so much that goes into winning, and I think God cares a lot more about those things. Ultimately, He cares more about the people than He does about the winning. Sometimes the greatest affect on a person comes from losing. In other words, some people need to lose to be the people God wants them to be. Some players need to forgive a teammate for making a bad decision or taking a bad shot. God cares more that they learn to show compassion and forgive than He does about their winning.

There’s a song that goes right to the heart of this matter by Laura Story. It’s called “Blessings”:

We pray for blessings, we pray for peace
Comfort for family, protection while we sleep

After a catalog of other things Christians have been known to pray for, the song turns and asks in the chorus, penetrating questions:

‘Cause what if Your blessings come through rain drops
What if Your healing comes through tears
What if a thousand sleepless nights are what it takes to know You’re near
What if trials of this life are Your mercies in disguise

Sports can be a training ground for young athletes, and we who are on the sidelines, or on this side of the TV, watching have no way of knowing what God is doing in the lives of those people running up and down the court. I think God cares a great deal for each one of those student-athletes, but I don’t know if that means He’ll calm a nervous heart so a young man can play up to his potential or if He’ll prompt a player to say a kind word to an opponent or allow a TV camera to distract him so he misses a key free throw.

The book of James makes a couple clear statements about prayer:

You do not have because you do not ask. You ask and do not receive because you ask with wrong motives so that you may spend it on your pleasures. (James 4:2b-3)

So God wants us to ask—just not with wrong motives, not selfishly.

Does He care about who wins the NCAA Tournament? In the grand scheme of things, probably not, but how the winning and losing and all that leads up to those results affects us, absolutely: God cares because He uses raindrops for His purposes. Or teardrops.

You have taken account of my wanderings;
Put my tears in Your bottle,
Are they not in Your book? (Psalm 56:8)

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Published in: on March 16, 2017 at 5:21 pm  Comments (1)  
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Lessons Learned On The Football Field


Broncos linebackerToday is the beginning of the NFL preseason. The Broncos have traveled to Chicago and take on the team under the direction of their old coach, John Fox. So it seems fitting to revisit an article from a few years ago.

I don’t think I’ll ever forget a play that happened in the Ravens-Broncos NFL season opener a few years ago. As it turned out, it had no bearing on the result of the game, but I suspect it had great impact on the young man involved.

Danny Trevathan, a second-year Denver Broncos linebacker [who has moved on through free agency, to Chicago, no less], made a remarkable play on a pass from Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco, jumping the pass route, intercepting the pass, and racing to the end zone.

Trouble is, in his enthusiasm to begin his celebration dance, he dropped the ball before he crossed into the end zone. What should have been an easy Denver touchdown turned into a touch back, giving the Ravens the ball again on the 20 yard line.

Fortunately for the Broncos and for Danny Trevathan, the game wasn’t close, and there wasn’t enough time left for the Ravens to mount a comeback. But that kind of play is often one of those momentum changers.

The thing is, Danny Trevathan really had made a great play. It was a third down, with the Ravens driving and perhaps just enough time on the clock for them to at least make the game respectable if they could score and then recover an onside kick.

But after making his terrific, timely interception, Danny didn’t wait for others to praise him. He went for the glory himself, and in the process robbed himself of the very thing he sought.

I couldn’t help but think of a number of verses in Scripture that tell us pride goes before destruction and a haughty spirit before a fall. Besides Solomon’s wisdom in Proverbs, David talks about God abasing “haughty eyes,” James declares God’s attitude toward pride, and Peter repeats the same thing in an extended version:

God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble. Therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God that He may exalt you at the proper time. (1 Peter 5:5b-6)

Sadly Danny Trevathan apparently hasn’t learned the principle of letting others praise you and not your own mouth. Apparently he hasn’t learned that God abases the kind of pride he was ready to display.

But what a fortunate guy. True, his blooper happened in front of a national television audience, but it didn’t cost the Broncos the game. And it happened in a game. I mean, football is big business, and all, but it didn’t happen in a venue where people’s lives hinged on what he did or failed to do.

Plus, he gets to learn a valuable lesson that just might last a lifetime. In truth, this lesson could influence his entire worldview. Might it even be an opening for him to learn about God’s attitude toward pride? Now that would make Danny Trevathan a real winner . . . in spite of dropping the ball on the one foot line.

This post is an edited version of one that first appeared here in September 2013.

Published in: on August 11, 2016 at 6:00 pm  Comments (1)  
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Preparing For The Super Bowl


Denver_Broncos2In the two weeks leading up to the Super Bowl, the Denver Broncos went about their business in the same way that they had each of the previous weeks of the 2015 season and playoffs. Over and over coach Gary Kubiak would answer media questions by saying the team was focused on this week’s opponent.

No, they didn’t think about who would be the quarterback in the playoffs or even next week, for example. They had determined who would be the quarterback this week and they were preparing accordingly.

Of course the pre-Super Bowl activities challenged their resolve. As player after player met the media, they fielded questions about how it felt to be such a big underdog, whether or not Peyton Manning was going to retire, whether switching quarterbacks had caused friction in the locker room and many more.

Repeatedly they said they were staying in the moment, enjoying the experiences of the Super Bowl activities, but preparing for the game.

BroncosCelebrationNot all the players made it. One young man who was on the practice squad was caught up in a prostitution sting. Though he wasn’t charged by the police, the team sent him home. He wasn’t on the same page with the others. Consequently he lost out. When the Broncos took control of the game and beat the highly favored Carolina Panthers, that young man was not on the sidelines. I don’t know if he was included in yesterday’s parade in Denver before a million fans.

What he did was a betrayal of his team. He lost his focus and involved himself in some of the very distractions the coaches had warned them to avoid.

But here’s the thing. What the Denver Broncos went through, particularly during those last two weeks before the Super Bowl, when the distractions were ramped up to an incredible height, mirrors what the Christian experiences day after day.

We’re in the same kind of grind that the Broncos were in. Out of sight, behind closed doors, we prepare our hearts before God, then we face the day, with all of its challenges and temptations and distractions. We have a prize we’re going for, but in the long haul, we need to stay focused and keep our minds set on things above, not on things on the earth.

Therefore if you have been raised up with Christ, keep seeking the things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your mind on the things above, not on the things that are on earth. For you have died and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, who is our life, is revealed, then you also will be revealed with Him in glory. (Colossians 3:1-4)

We’re playing for the reward of the inheritance, for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus. We celebrate the victory Christ has already won, but we also buffet our body and train our minds. We focus on the things above because we are saved and are being saved.

In essence, we’ve won through Christ but now we must go out and play the game.

I’m mindful of Joshua and the people of Israel as the walls of Jericho fell. What a wondrous miracle of God. And yet, Israel still had to conquer the city. There was still a battle to be won.

In the same way, the Christian can bask in the victory Christ has procured for us. But nevertheless, we have battles to fight—against the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, the boastful pride of life. Against ourselves, against Satan and his forces, against the world and its pull.

We’d be wise, then, to adopt the plan of the Denver Broncos—stay in the moment, do what today calls for us to do. It sounds quite existential. But the point is, we really only have this moment. The past is gone and can’t be changed. We have no promise of tomorrow. If we are to press on toward the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus, we must do so today. Now. With our focus firmly set against the distractions that would pull us away from the things above.

Published in: on February 10, 2016 at 5:31 pm  Comments Off on Preparing For The Super Bowl  
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Things Aren’t Always The Way They Seem (Or How The Broncos Beat The Patriots)


Peyton_Manning_Throwing_TD509I’m a big Denver Broncos football fan (and a sports nut in general, as you may know). I was born in Denver but have lived most of my life in Southern California. Even when we had football teams here, as we are apparently positioned to have again, I was still a Broncos fan.

It goes back to my college days, I guess, when my parents lived in Denver and I would spend the summer there. Summers, as you may know, mean football training camp and the beginning of the preseason. The Broncos were the first major league team in any sport in Denver, so the city has a huge love affair with the team. Consequently, any football news, and certainly training camp qualifies, was front and center in Denver during those summer months I was there. It was infectious.

At any rate, the Broncos just won the American Football Conference championship, sending them to the Super Bowl in two weeks to play against the National Football Conference champion Carolina Panthers.

For weeks now, the experts who make predictions about games have been picking against the Broncos. They had their stats to back up their decision. One that was repeated over and over was that Peyton Manning, the Broncos quarterback, had only thrown nine touchdown passes and seventeen interceptions.

It was a true stat. But what no one said was that Peyton was hurt for the first two months of the season, until he finally missed six weeks while he got treatment. Turns out he had been dealing for months with plantar fasciitis, a condition that causes pain in the heel and bottom of the foot. Because he continued to play on it, he eventually experienced a tear. The treatment was to have his foot immobilized for two weeks—along with who knows what in his rehab phase.

When Peyton came back in the middle of the final week of the season, the experts nevertheless reported that only Peyton’s knowledge and experience were valuable to the team, that what he contributed physically was a liability. Even when the Broncos beat Pittsburgh in the Division Playoffs, Peyton was criticized more than he was praised. He was a game manager now, the experts said, and that label was meant as disrespect.

After all, the once great quarterback who set records—more touchdowns in one year than anyone in history, and the like—was now dependent on a running game. How the mighty have fallen!

In truth, the experts said, Peyton couldn’t run the new coach’s offense because it required him to make throws he could no longer make. He couldn’t run the bootleg and he couldn’t throw long and he couldn’t throw to the sidelines.

So you see, the Broncos simply could not generate enough offense to win a game against a player such as Tom Brady of the New England Patriots.

Until, of course, Peyton threw a touchdown of twenty-one yards and another one to the back corner of the end zone, and until he ran twelve yards for a first down.

Peyton_Manning_2014Was he the “old Peyton”? The one who set all those records two years ago? No. From what I understand, plantar fasciitis takes considerably longer to heal, so I have no doubt that he’s still not one hundred percent healthy. Just a whole lot better than he had been.

But here’s the point. When everyone was looking at Peyton’s seventeen interceptions—and those coming in ten games instead of the full complement of sixteen, they made a determination about what kind of performance they’d see from him during Championship Sunday. They didn’t realize the stats lied because they were about the performance of an injured Peyton Manning, not a healthier player who engineered the win against New England.

The same was true about the Patriots and Tom Brady. Their stats were the opposite of Peyton’s. Tom was on a mission and was playing his best ball of his career. Except those stats came mostly against teams that didn’t make the playoffs, against defenses that weren’t ferocious.

Tom Brady is a good quarterback . . . maybe even a great quarterback . . . but people were making judgments about how he would perform on Sunday based on what he’d done against lesser defenses.

So here’s the bottom line. Appearances aren’t everything. And sometimes stats can lie. If I told you I won ten out of ten one-on-one basketball games against my neighbor’s son, you might think, Wow, she can still play. But what if you found out my neighbor’s son was six? Uh, the stats can lie.

Things really aren’t as they seem, at least not always. It’s an important point I think, because we tend to be a society preoccupied with appearance and eager to jump on bandwagons. Oh, we say, the experts have all these stats that point to the Patriots steamrolling the Broncos, so that’s surely what will happen.

But it didn’t.

Maybe there’s a lesson for life in there. Maybe we should all be willing to look a little deeper than that first stat line.

Published in: on January 25, 2016 at 6:37 pm  Comments (8)  
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Deflategate


Pittsburgh_sign_(2981919088)The day after Championship Sunday, football fans were talking about “Deflategate.” By Thursday night the story was the lead on our local news and we don’t even have an NFL team.

If nothing else, the US takes our sports seriously. Football, which had so recently ascended to the top of the heap, replacing baseball as America’s game, has been struggling. 2014 was the year of disaster for the NFL, but the problems went back further.

What was it, 2007 when Spygate dominated the talk shows? New England (yes, the same team involved in this year’s debacle) broke NFL rules by filming an opposing team’s sideline during a game as their coaches sent signals to their players. A big deal? Most people didn’t think so, but it was against league rules.

Then in 2012 the New Orleans Saints were caught in the bounty scandal. Reportedly as many as 24 defensive players were paid for hard hits on opposing quarterbacks. The head coach, Sean Payton, received the stiffest penalty—a year’s suspension—because he knew about the program and did nothing to stop it.

A number of pundits, however, claimed that most teams had some similar program in place, but the Saints were the ones caught, and the League wanted to send a message to the others by the harsh sanctions.

Need I mention the Ray Rice mess that took place this past summer—domestic violence caught on camera, and the League suspended him for two weeks. When cries of protest arose, then Commissioner Roger Godell backtracked and handed down a tougher penalty. But when another video came out, the longer suspension was turned into an indefinite suspension, which Ray Rice contested, and won.

Meanwhile, Adrian Peterson came under fire because he took a switch to his young son. He received the full wrath of the commissioner’s office—they weren’t going to pull another Ray Rice.

Once the season got started, things seemed to quiet down—only a few drug suspensions, the $70,000 Ndamukong Suh fine for stepping on Aaron Rogers, purposefully—just average stuff.

But now, with deflategate, we’re back to the issue of cheating, specifically the charge that someone on New England’s sideline deflated the game footballs in the AFC Championship, reducing the pressure by two pounds in 11 of the 12 game balls. Under inflated footballs. The way Tom Brady likes it.

Is this really such a horrible crime, fans ask, especially those hoping for a Patriot Super Bowl victory. I mean, no one got clocked on camera, no pictures exist of bruising on a child’s body. No money exchanged hands at the expense of purposeful bodily harm. And no one was intentionally stepped on. What’s the big deal?

Add in the fact that no one thinks the Colts would have own the game if those balls had been properly inflated. In other words, the Pats cheated, but they would have won anyway.

So does that make cheating, not cheating?

And is cheating a big deal?

Well, in some schools, if you cheat you get kicked out. What if the NFL adopted that policy? If you cheat—take performance enhancing drugs, spy on the opponent, put a bounty on another player’s head, deflate footballs—you get kicked out of the League.

Which would elevate cheating to a level higher than domestic violence.

It’s not really an easy thing to determine. On one hand, we have a tendency to say, It’s just a game. Lighten up. But the reality is, pro football is big business. Not only are the players contracted for huge sums of money, the teams are raking in the green with their ticket prices and all that goes with attending games. Then there’s the league with all the merchandising and TV deals. And then we come to the real money connected to the sport: gambling. As my brother reminded me, millions of dollars are tied to NFL games, sometimes on the over-under of game scores. What have deflated balls (because who knows if the Pat’s quarterback would cheat in the Championship game, he hasn’t been cheating all season?) done to the scores and to the win/loss of millions of bettors?

But let’s pretend for a second that cheating didn’t cost anybody anything. It just gave one team a slight edge which they didn’t need anyway.

Is there really nothing wrong with them sending the message to every kid out there, Do anything, even break the rules, in order to win.

We’ve been sending that message for some time. Al Davis, when he coached the Oakland Raiders, used to say, Just win, baby. His teams did all they could, including things that weren’t legal, to win games. In fact, some of the rules the NFL has now were put in to stop some of the shenanigans the Raiders pulled (like fumble the ball forward or bat it forward to get the necessary yards for a first down, or to score a touchdown).

And now it’s the Patriots. If they go on to win the Super Bowl, no matter what happens afterward, the message will be clear—cheaters do prosper.

But we’ve been sending that message through other avenues than sports—corporate greed, for example, and government corruption. CEOs can lead their companies into bankruptcy and still collect million dollar bonuses. Lobbyists can bribe, uh grease the palms, no give payola, how about, gift legislators who they wish to influence, and the process is “legal.”

Maybe it’s time we say enough with the cheating. People need to play fair. Hard work, not hard cash or who you know or how much you can get by with, should enable someone to get ahead.

So I say, throw the book at the Patriots. They have a history of cheating and of walking as close to the line as they can get when it comes to playing by the rules. Just ask Baltimore about the six eligible receivers stunt the Patriots pulled the week before deflategate.

Cheaters ought not prosper, and if the NFL commissioner’s office doesn’t see that and doesn’t take action, more than “the integrity of the game” will be lost.

Published in: on January 23, 2015 at 6:28 pm  Comments Off on Deflategate  
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Winning And Losing


Clayton_Kershaw_2010This past week has been filled with sports for someone like me who follows most sports and cheers for the teams in the LA area. Oh, and a Denver Broncos fan, too.

We had two teams in the Major League Baseball playoffs, USC football played on Saturday and a few hours later UCLA played as well. Then on Sunday the Broncos played in the afternoon.

The results of the eight games were mixed. First the Angels, after losing the opening game of their series against Kansas City in overtime, got swept out of the playoffs. Next the Dodgers, after taking a 6-1 lead behind the probable Cy Young Award winner, Clayton Kershaw, ended up losing their opening game, 10-9.

At the same time, USC lost the game against Arizona St. after leading most of the way when they gave up a “hail Mary” touchdown as time ran out. UCLA, having crushed Arizona St. last week, faced Utah. They trailed most of the game, took the lead late in the fourth quarter, then gave up a field goal in the last seconds and lost.

So when does the winning start? Well, the Dodgers came back in their game two and won to even their series with St. Louis. Then the Broncos came through yesterday to hand the Arizona Cardinals their first loss of the season. Still, that’s a lot of losing in just a short period of time.

But here’s the truth about winning and losing: it’s transient. The team that wins in February will begin a new season in September and have to do it all over again. There is no permanent winner—at least not when we’re talking about sports or business or the lottery or contests or anything else you might expect to find a winner.

The Heisman Trophy winner receives the accolades for his accomplishment, but the next year either returns to school or starts a career as a rookie football player or as a newbie in a different field. In other words, people won’t pay him for life because he won the Heisman Trophy in 2014.

In that respect, wins and losses are equal. Once they are over, they are memories. Sure, wins are most likely happy memories and losses may be painful, but here’s the truth. What lasts is what a person learns through the experience.

Players can learn more through the experiences of winning and losing then can fans, I would think. Fans are emotionally invested but incapable of affecting the outcome of a game. Maybe the greatest lesson for a fan is to hold games loosely. After all, only one team will walk away as the World Series champs.

Most teams when they celebrate with a parade down their city streets end up making some sort of statement about the next year—usually something like, Let’s do this again next year. In other words, they understand another season awaits in which the just-completed championship win will mean nothing.

So why do we try to win video games or chess matches or employee-of-the-year prizes or bridal-shower games or . . . you name it? Winning validates our abilities or our emotional connection or city association with a team. But because of the nature of winning and losing, we’re quickly right back where we were, wondering again if we’re good enough, smart enough, talented enough.

As the fans of the New England Patriots. After getting blown out by Kansas City a week ago, fans and media pundits were questioning whether or not their highly touted coach and quarterback could still get it done. Was Tom Brady over the hill, they asked? Would the coach consider a change at that position? Of course all those questions went away when the Patriots dominated Cincinnati Sunday night.

So what’s the point? Winning and losing are both temporal. They need to be held with an open hand. A false view of winning leads to pride and a false view of losing leads to despair, which is really the flip side of pride. Both are exaggerated views of self.

The only thing that lasts is what we do for the kingdom of God. The rest ends up being the wood, hay, and stubble Scripture says will burn up. The eternal things are good works as simple as giving a cup of cold water to a thirsty stranger.

Those things God promises to reward, and His “well done, good and faithful servant, last for eternity.

In the end, the only winning that matters is that which Jesus Christ accomplished in His work at the cross where He triumphed over sin and death, over His enemies, over guilt and the law. As Corrie ten Boom loved to say, Jesus is Victor.

Being His follower is the only sure thing out there. We can’t be sure if we’ll have a job tomorrow or if we’ll arrive home safely after work or if we have cancer cells growing in our body or will get bit by a mosquito with West Nile Virus or will fall and break an ankle or a wrist trying to stop our fall. We expect things to go the way we consider “normal”—without glitches or interruptions or anomalies. And God graciously gives us what we need day after day, even as He gave manna to the people of Israel six out of seven days for forty years!

But there are those days when we’re out of water or a river separates us from where we’re going or giants are in the land or thick walls obstruct us from what we plan to accomplish. In those instances, we need to keep our perspective. God is still the Victor. The circumstances that appear daunting or even “terminal” do not change who God is or what His Son has done.

Winning and losing both, even in things as trivial as MLA playoff games, give us an opportunity to remember what’s eternal, what real winning looks like (that would be the sinless Son of God hanging on a cross for our benefit).

And you thought watching sports was just a fun thing to do! 😉

Published in: on October 6, 2014 at 5:47 pm  Comments Off on Winning And Losing  
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Football Friday


BroncosIt’s the NFL draft, what can I say? 😉

I love sports. Usually this is my favorite time of the year—basketball playoffs, hockey playoffs, and baseball just getting started. But mostly basketball playoffs.

Because the Lakers are AWOL this year, leaving the troubled Clippers to represent LA, I’d just as soon see the Spurs of San Antonio win. But to be honest, I’ll be content if any team other than Miami wins. I don’t know what the media love affair with LeBron James is, but I’m not a fan.

Hockey is exciting during the playoffs, and with two SoCal teams in the hunt, it’s more interesting than usual.

This is the second best time to pay attention to baseball because it is now that teams sort themselves out as top tier or lower tier. Only the top tier will be around during the best time to pay attention to baseball—the final drive to the playoffs and the playoffs themselves.

The only thing to detract from those exciting times is the beginning of football! Of course some people think football started this week with the draft or some weeks ago with the flurry of free agent deals.

I don’t usually pay much attention to this phase of the game because the big execs and the players in combination with their agents make all the decisions. I don’t get to tell my team, the Denver Broncos, to sign my favorite receiver, Eric Dekker, or to keep Champ Bailey out of respect to a future hall of famer.

No, this is the part of the game where money talks, but also where the decision makers have done the studying to know what the team needs and who’s available in the draft and in free agency and who they can afford. It’s all beyond me.

So mostly I recognize names of college guys who played in SoCal and the big profile guys the media talks about all the time.

It does get a little exciting, though. For example, the Broncos must have just completed some deal because they now have higher second round draft pick, which they’re about to announce. I can only imagine that they think the player they want might not be around for six more picks. So I can hardly wait to see who that player is.

Of course earlier AFC West rivals San Diego traded up also (they already picked ahead of Denver) in order to take a defensive player they wanted.

The Broncos first pick was a cornerback—a position where they needed help. Last year they had critical injuries late in the season, losing their best cover corner, Chris Harris to a torn ACL. I can’t imagine he’ll be ready to come back by training camp, but no one is talking as if he’s not the Broncos starter.

So now they have their second pick, a wide receiver this time—hopefully good enough to replace my favorite guy who will be off catching passes in New York this year.

But there you have it—my rambling thoughts about the second round of the NFL draft, up to the point that the Broncos picked. Is there a spiritual analogy to all this? A life lesson? No, not really. Just a football fan, spouting off.

Your turn. Anyone care to weigh in on how your team is doing in the draft? Or what sport you prefer or what activity you prefer to sports? Feel free to have your say. 😀

Published in: on May 9, 2014 at 6:28 pm  Comments (2)  
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Lessons Learned On The Football Field


Broncos linebackerI don’t think I’ll ever forget a play that happened last night in the Ravens-Broncos NFL opening-season game. As it turned out, it had no bearing on the result of the game, but I suspect it had great impact on the young man involved.

Danny Trevathan, a second-year Denver Broncos linebacker, made a remarkable play on a pass from Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco, jumping the pass route, intercepting the pass, and racing to the end zone.

Trouble is, in his enthusiasm to begin his celebration dance, he dropped the ball before he crossed into the end zone. What should have been an easy Denver touchdown turned into a touch back, giving the Ravens the ball again on the 20 yard line.

Fortunately for the Broncos and for Danny Trevathan, the game wasn’t close, and there wasn’t enough time left for the Ravens to mount a comeback. But that kind of play is often one of those momentum changers.

The thing is, Danny Trevathan really had made a great play. It was a third down, with the Ravens driving and perhaps just enough time on the clock for them to at least make the game respectable if they could score and then recover an onside kick.

But after making his terrific, timely interception, Danny didn’t wait for others to praise him. He went for the glory himself, and in the process robbed himself of the very thing he sought.

I couldn’t help but think of a number of verses in Scripture that tell us pride goes before destruction and a haughty spirit before a fall. Besides Solomon’s wisdom in Proverbs, David talks about God abasing “haughty eyes,” James declares God’s attitude toward pride, and Peter repeats the same thing in an extended version:

God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble. Therefore humble yourselves under the mighty hand of God that He may exalt you at the proper time. (1 Peter 5:5b-6)

Sadly Danny Trevathan apparently hasn’t learned the principle of letting others praise you and not your own mouth. Apparently he hasn’t learned that God abases the kind of pride he was ready to display.

But what a fortunate guy. True, his blooper happened in front of a national television audience, but it didn’t cost the Broncos the game. And it happened in a game. I mean, football is big business, and all, but it didn’t happen in a venue where people’s lives hinged on what he did or failed to do.

Plus, he gets to learn a valuable lesson that just might last a lifetime. In truth, this lesson could influence his entire worldview. Might it even be an opening for him to learn about God’s attitude toward pride? Now that would make Danny Trevathan a real winner . . . in spite of dropping the ball on the one foot line.

Published in: on September 6, 2013 at 7:31 pm  Comments (6)  
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