So, Groundhog Day


For whatever reason, I didn’t hear much about Groundhog Day this year. Until I looked it up today, I didn’t even know exactly when it was. Apparently I’m on an island. Deserted. Alone. Because thousands of people turned out this past Saturday to watch the most famous groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil, look for his shadow. What’s more, these folks had to be up at the crack of dawn because the event took place at 7:25 AM. On a Saturday morning. In the dead of winter. During a cold snap—or polar vortex as the weather people all call it now. What’s more, the “event” was live-streamed.

It was more like a non-event from what I could tell. I mean, the guy in charge of the overfed rodent, set him down on a tree stump for maybe 10 seconds, declared he couldn’t see his shadow, then read from the scroll that said spring would make an early arrival.

We all know this is a lot of silliness, don’t we? I mean, Phil has only a 40% success rate over the last ten years. People would do better if they simply flipped a coin. And he isn’t really 133. He’s not the same groundhog from those early days.

Then why do people get so caught up in the spectacle? I mean, there’s no alcohol involved that I could detect. No commercialism. No one selling tee shirts or Happy Groundhog Day cards. No bumper stickers or commemorative hats. So why do people care?

I’ve never talked to a single person who is out there in the freezing cold waiting for the faux prediction about the coming of spring, so all I have is speculation.

Could be they’re bored. But that’s a bit of a stretch when there’s entertainment at every turn, and much of it indoors where the temps are some 60° higher.

Perhaps some actually believe in Phil. Maybe they’re driven by that need to know, and particularly the need to know before it actually happens which has driven the news industry for far too lon.

Do they want spring to come early so badly that they are willing to put their faith in a groundhog? An overfed rodent covered in straw?

Could there be something deeper here? Do people want to believe so badly in something these days so that they are willing to pretend to believe in Phil’s ability to predict the length of winter?

For whatever reason, the folks who show up, who belong to the club, who care for the groundhog all the year round, think this is fun.

But I can’t help but compare their “faith” with the real deal that Christians have.

One thing that jumps out at me is that the superstitious faith in Phil doesn’t depend on anything. Not whether he’s right, not whether the person shows up the following year, not whether any other groundhog agrees with his outcome. It’s sort of like playing the lottery.

Saving faith, based on the work of Jesus Christ at the cross, is lived day in and day out. It’s transformative and dependable.

Superstitious faith in Phil doesn’t cost a person anything, takes no commitment, except getting up early on a cold winter’s day.

Saving faith is an all-in proposition. Jesus said if we want to come after Him we must deny ourselves daily, take up our cross and follow Him.

Superstitious faith in Phil is not life changing. A person can “believe” in the ground hog and still believe in the weather report on their phone app.

Saving faith, well, saves. It transforms a person from death to life. It begins a relationship with the living God. It ushers us into the kingdom of God.

In short, superstitious faith in Phil is meaningless. Nothing changes if he’s right or if he’s wrong, other than the guy from his fan club reading a different little scroll.

Saving faith, on the other hand, is the most meaningful decision a person can make. So it ought not be made lightly. It should be informed.

Superstitious faith in Phil is closer to guess work and not quite as accurate.

Saving Faith brings forgiveness of sin, freedom from the Law, from guilt. It gives believers peace within. Comfort. Help in time of need. Joy. Purpose. But above all it brings assurance. No guess work!

There’s more, but the point is clear. False faith—whether in Phil or in a Hindu god or in a cult or anything else that is not true—is markedly different from saving faith.

Advertisements
Published in: on February 5, 2019 at 5:56 pm  Comments (4)  
Tags: , , ,
%d bloggers like this: