Stability

The new year has kicked in, and for me personally, stability is on my mind more than anything else. Maybe I’ll make it my word for the year. The reason is simple, the lingering effect of my stroke is that I lack stability. Not as much as I did close to the event, for sure. But the fact is, I’m still less stable than I use to be.

I was trying to explain the sensation to a friend, and finally landed on this: I feel like I’m always walking on ice. That’s not quite right, but it’s close. You see, I can feel unstable even when I’m not walking. Until recently. I’ve had about a week now that I can stand without holding on to anything—the wall, furniture, my cane—and feel quite stable. That’s progress, let me assure you!

Because stability is on my mind so much, I can’t help but expand on the idea to our western society and the world at large. I have to conclude that we are all struggling with stability to some degree.

Of course wars and rumors of war, terrorism and riots, all contribute to this. So do natural disasters—hurricanes in the Caribbean and the southern US, earthquakes in Mexico, biting below-freezing temperatures in the northeast, wild fires in SoCal.

Then there are the ongoing problems of sex-trafficking, poverty, crime, famine, oppression, abuse—some here at home and some abroad.

The world is not a stable place right now.

All this and I haven’t mentioned US politics. I could carry on for quite a while on that subject, but I’m more interested in what’s behind our lack of stability, not the actually teetering from side to side that we’re experiencing.

As I see it, all these issues have the same cause: we have compromised truth. Sometimes we compromise truth in favor of power. We think a certain person or nation or party needs to be in control, so we look the other way when truth is in question. Bernie Sanders isn’t a Democrat? Well, never mind. We want him instead of someone else. Marco Rubio is not advocating for amnesty? Well, never mind, it’s convenient to say he is because we want someone else to be in power. You get the picture.

This careless handling of the truth extends from the obvious to the less obvious, but it has slipped into our culture so easily because the postmodern philosophy that we embrace believes truth is relative. Some of the time.

Actually, when it’s convenient, people stand up and clamor for the truth. At least the truth as they have constructed it. Consequently, we have “safe places” and “trigger alerts” to make sure that whatever I think might be an offense to me, doesn’t touch my ears. Because if I feel it’s an offense, then it IS an offense. In the same way that males who feel like they are women, actually can claim to be women.

We are on slippery ground, very unstable, because we’ve sold truth. Or traded it away. We certainly don’t cling to the rock solid, authoritative, veracity much any more.

In fact, one thing that sends people scurrying for their safe place is to say that YOU KNOW. I mean, what an audacious thing. No one can know anything. Don’t you know that?!

Ironic isn’t it. The only thing we know for certain is that we can’t know anything for certain.

Reminds me of the position of atheists. The universe is so vast we can’t possibly know all things, and that’s OK. But we know for certain there is no God.

Well, I know for certain there is a God. The Most High God, in fact. Creator of heaven and earth.

I know Christians who cringe at such a statement. What would it take, some say, for you to question your belief in God? Aren’t you being sort of pig-headed and dogmatic?

I try to explain: how can I un-know what I already know. I am in a relationship with the God of the universe. He’s my Father, my Friend, my Savior, my Lord. Am I supposed to pretend that something can be laid out for me to rip up that relationship?

The fact is, my knowledge of the Truth about God is not relative. It’s not based on how I feel or some kind of brain stimuli. God would exist whether I believed in Him or not. God existed before I came on the scene and He will exist long after I’m gone.

Knowledge of God brings stability. There’s an anchor that keeps other relationships and morality and purposes in place. Some things aren’t floating off in left field while others are defying gravity. On the contrary, just like the laws of physics that allow for us to do things like fly airplanes, the truth of God makes sense of life.

Was it CS Lewis who first said his belief in God is like his belief in the sun. Not because he can see it, but by it he can see everything else.

The truth of God applied brings the stability we need.

Trying to fix the world by any other means is a losing prospect. You can’t dig enough wells in Africa or bring down enough criminals or feed and clothe enough people in poverty. Not that we should sit on our hands. But the real life-changing action we can take is to speak the truth in love.

In love.

Otherwise, as 1 Corinthians says, we’ll be nothing but noisy gongs and clanging cymbals.

To be on balance we really need to be standing on the rock of truth and speaking from that place in love. Everything else is a slippery slope.

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Published in: on January 2, 2018 at 5:45 pm  Comments (4)  
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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. […] via Stability — A Christian Worldview of Fiction […]

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  2. Amen,Becky! So well said.

    One of the most interesting things about the human body is our sense of balance and stability. To this day we cannot replicate it in robots, we cannot make them walk and stand as people do, because the amount of data we must take in and the constant adjustments required, is just phenomenal.

    Love this, “The truth of God applied brings the stability we need.” Amen. He brings order to my chaos, stability to my soul, and safe place to hang onto.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. […] To be on balance we really need to be standing on the rock of truth and speaking from that place in love. Everything else is a slippery slope.  Rebecca Luella Miller […]

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  4. […] between walking with a cane and walking without a cane. My issue is balance, as I mentioned back in January. Some might recall that I described the sensation I experienced as sort of, but not quite, like […]

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