Christians And Battle

The Bible sets up the Christian’s life as as one of confrontation. The Apostle Paul says things like, Put on the full armor of God. And compete to win the prize, discipline your body, box as if you are not pretending. The writer of Hebrews even says

You have not yet resisted to the point of shedding blood in your striving against sin (Heb. 12:4).

So there’s striving and there’s bleeding.

Of course the great mark against Christians is also battle—the bloody and futile crusades of the Middle Ages. Add to that the hymns of old, like “Onward Christian Soldier” and “Am I A Soldier Of The Cross,” and we Christians have been pegged as a contentious bunch.

I think in some ways, we play into that stereotype. Protestant denominations, for example, have experienced splits and splits of splits. Of course, Catholics have their own cross to bear because of their doctrine of excommunication. Some protestant churches also practice church discipline in such a way that the battle very much seems like one between believers.

Paul clearly stated in the spiritual armor passage that our battle is a spiritual one and our enemies are not other people.

For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places. (Eph. 6:12)

The opposition Christians face necessitate the spiritual armor. No one would walk into a physical battle with nothing but truth, righteousness, the gospel of peace, faith, salvation, and the word of God. Those provide spiritual protection against spiritual confrontation from spiritual foes.

Too often in the history of the Church, it seems we have become entangled in physical struggles. Most people today recoil at the “holy wars” intended to win Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslims. There really wasn’t anything holy about the attempted extension of power and influence by those aligned in the Crusades.

The same might be said about a number of other instances in which religious struggle was merely a cover for physical dominance and had nothing to do with the spiritual conflict the Bible points us toward.

I have to wonder if today we aren’t still missing who we are to be fighting. Let me put it bluntly. The LGBTQ community is not the enemy. Sin and Satan and the temptations to pride and rebellion are the enemy.

Disney is not the enemy. The media is not the enemy. Liberals of any stripe are not the enemy. The enemy is not flesh and blood. Our enemy is spiritual. World forces of darkness. Spiritual forces of wickedness.

People, humans with sin natures just like yours and mine, are not the front line soldiers in the battle. Rather, each of us is in need of rescue. We’re trapped by the world forces of darkness unless our God redeems us and transfers us to the kingdom of His Son (see Col. 1:10).

The child game of capture the flag comes to mind. As I recall, each team had something to protect and something to gain. In the process, team members might be captured and thrown into “prison” where they awaited rescue from someone on their side. The enemy at that point was the “system” that held them in “prison” awaiting rescue.

Of course the metaphor breaks down at that point because the game was played against other children and obviously had a physical component. But the image of being held captive and awaiting rescue is helpful, I think, in understanding mankind’s condition.

At various times in this game, players can become so intent on capturing other opponents that they take their eye off the flag they are supposed to be guarding. At that moment, they are most vulnerable to attack.

In the Christian life, we are told repeatedly to stand firm, to be alert, to guard against. In other words, our role in the battle seems so . . . defensive.

The work we’ve been given that is not battle oriented is to be ambassadors for Christ, to be ministers of reconciliation. to love our neighbors and our enemies.

I think too often we get our tasks mixed up. We don’t protect against the spiritual forces because we are too busy going after those we are to love and serve.

I’ll be honest. I don’t know how loving LGBTQ members is suppose to look. I mean, as soon as the word sin comes out of our mouths, someone is accusing us of hate speech. But the truth is, if we hate a sinner, we’re actually hating all of humankind because there is none righteous, no, not one. If in doubt, take a look at the end results—Scripture says the wages of sin is death, and people are still dying, one out of every one.

But here’s the thing. LGBTQ members or drug addicts or prostitutes or porn queens or any other person involved in a sinful lifestyle will not face judgment because of their lifestyle. They will face judgment because they have rejected God’s answer to their need: the Savior He sent to rescue them.

He who does not believe has been judged already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. (John 3:18b)

I suggest, then, that to do our work as defenders of the faith against spiritual forces of wickedness and to be ministers of reconciliation, we need to point to Jesus Christ. He is the one who came to save, and He is the one who stands in the gap against the evil one.

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Published in: on March 9, 2017 at 4:45 pm  Comments (6)  
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6 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Oh, amen to this post, Becky!

    Often we forget Ephesians 6:12, “For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.”

    NOT against flesh and blood, which would mean the actual sinner in front of us, or even other Christians. We are not supposed to be wiping people themselves out, but rather sin.

    As to the LGBT community, one thing that has allowed me to stay strong there is that I know the link between child sexual abuse and homosexuality. I know of two people who now realize that the abuse they suffered is what shaped their sexuality and came to define them. It can help us to empathize better, but it can also help us to understand that to waffle on the sin of homosexuality is to let those kids of long ago down. They need us to stand.

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  2. I love this post. Our fight is indeed to be fought with love and faith and the word of God. Our strength and armor is God Himself. The wars that are fought with death and killing are full of hate and sin. The God I know isn’t about division and death.
    The battles for Christ must be won with love and tolerance, not judgement and scorn.

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    • I agree, stblog. A popular method of controlling people these days is to shame them. So we may not actually go to war, but we use our words and actions in a way that kills the spirit. Or makes them want to fight what we’re saying to protect themselves. It’s hard to speak the truth and to love, but that’s exactly what God has called us to do, and equipped us for.

      Becky

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  3. Thank you for this timely word! Our job is not to boycott, protest, etc. We are ambassadors for Christ, delivering the message of God’s love displayed through Christ to a lost and dying world. Sadly, Christians are often known more for what we are against than what we are for. The last time I checked, God is for us! He wants a relationship with us. We are soldiers for Christ, but are method of fighting the good fight of faith is not that of hatred.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well said, TCPastor. Yes, we should be holy because God is holy. But we can’t expect someone without Christ to be holy. And we ought not communicate the message that if they just follow our standards, then they’ll be right with God. No. Being like Christ comes only after relationship with Him.

      Becky

      Liked by 1 person


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