CSFF Blog Tour – Your Favorite, Day 1


Before I forget, we have just a little over a week left in the voting for the Clive Staples Award for Christian Speculative Fiction – Readers’ Choice. I hope you’re planning to vote.

The August CSFF Blog Tour is unique. Rather than feature a novel that’s recently been released, or a web site focused on Christian speculative fiction, we’re highlighting what each participating blogger wants to highlight. I have to say, I am eager to check out what everyone else is talking about (and will have looked at a few before I publish this post). In the meantime, I’m stuck writing about my favorite.

I say “stuck” because I’m really not much of a “favorite” kind of person. Others will often talk about their favorite Bible verse, for instance, and I’m generally at a loss. I might find one, think, Ah-ha, the perfect “favorite verse,” but by the next time I’m asked what mine is, I’ve forgotten which one I thought was so perfect.

Same with books. My “favorite” probably changes every time I’m asked.

Be that as it may, I’ll highlight a book I have ranked as one of my favorites in the past (though I unintentionally failed to mention it in my post at Speculative Faith today.)

Rather than telling you what the book is, however, I’m going to give “clues.” See how many you need before you guess the title (you can let me know in the comments section, if you like πŸ˜‰ )

(1) This book is a stand alone

(2) written in first person

(3) by a well-known author.

(4) The story is mythic fantasy

(5) about two sisters, or actually three,

(6) the eldest and ugliest and queen,

(7) telling the tale in the form of a journal.

(8) The story involves love

(9) and jealousy

(10) and loss

(11) and loneliness

(12) and eventual redemption.

(13) The queen’s name is Orual

(14) Her second journal ends with this:

I ended my first book with the words no answer. I know now, Lord, why you utter no answer. You are yourself the answer. Before your face questions die away. What other answer would suffice? Only words, words; to be led out to battle against other words. Long did I hate you, long did I fear you. I mightβ€”

(15) The book is dedicated to Joy Davidman.

(16) The author is one of the Inklings

(17) well-known for his children’s series, The Chronicles of Narnia.

(18) And the book, one of my all time favorites, yet one of C. S. Lewis’s least-known works is none other than Till We Have Faces.

Did I make it too obvious too soon?

Be that as it may, take some time this week and enjoy what the other participants (especially our two new members participating in their first tour, Morgan L. Busse and Sarah Sawyer) are talking about regarding their favorite.

Each check mark links to a particular post.

%d bloggers like this: