Recommended Christian Fiction – From Middle Grade to Adult


From time to time I get requests for a list of recommended Christian fiction. A couple years ago, I put together a Best of … [insert year] List, and I may again some time, but I found myself having to qualify the list, primarily because my reading is far from exhaustive. There are some genres I rarely touch, for instance. So it seems wiser to me to go with books I can recommend because I’ve read them. Some of these, if not all, I’ve reviewed, so I’ve linked to that post (either here or at Spec Faith) in case you’d like to read more.

Middle Grade
Chuck Black – Sir Kendrick and the Castle of Bel Lione
R. K. Mortenson – the Landon Snow series (Landon Snow and the Island of Arcanum, … the Volucer’s Dragon)
Jonathan Rogers – The Wilderking Trilogy (The Bark of the Bog Owl)
Andrew Peterson – The Wingfeather Saga (On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness)

Young Adult
Wayne Thomas Batson – The Door Within Trilogy; Isle of Swords
Bryan Davis – the Dragons in Our Midst series
Donita K. Paul – the DragonKeeper Chronicles (DragonKnight, DragonFire, DragonLight)

Adult
Fantasy
Karen Hancock – The Guardian King series (Return of the Guardian King)
Sharon Hinck – The Sword of Lyric series (The Restorer, The Restorer’s Son)
Stephen Lawhead – The King Raven series (Scarlet)
Tosca Lee – Demon: a Memoir
Kathryn Mackel – The Birthrighter series (Trackers)
Jeffrey Overstreet – Auralia’s Thread (Auralia’s Colors)
George Bryan Polivka – The Trophy Chase Trilogy (The Legend of the Firefish, The Hand That Bears the Sword, The Battle for Vast Dominion)

Science Fiction
Austin Boyd – The Mars Hills Classified trilogy (The Evidence, The Proof, The Return)
Sigmund Brouwer – Broken Angel
Chris Walley – The Lamb among the Stars series

Contemporary
Julie Carobini – Chocolate Beach
Kathryn Cushman – A Promise to Remember
Sharon Hinck – The Secret Life of Becky Miller; Renovating Becky Miller
Kathleen Popa – To Dance in the Desert
Sharon Souza – Every Good and Perfect Gift

Suspense
Brandilyn Collins – the Kanner Lake series (Violet Dawn, Coral Moon, Crimson Eve, Amber Morn)
Athol Dickson – Winter Haven
T. L. Hines – Waking Lazaras

Feel free to add your recommendations in the comments. 😀

Drying Up – A Writer Runs Out of Words


Recently Karen Hancock posted about writers drying up. I don’t recall if she had in mind the words drying up or the ideas. Interestingly, years ago in his book Language of Love, non-fiction writer Gary Smalley mentioned each of us has a certain number of words in us (women with a larger amount than men, on the average), so possibly we writers do run out of words on any given day.

I think I do.

After long blog posts or numerous comments on discussion boards or answering a good number of emails, I get to a point where I just want to stop putting out more words. I want to sit and absorb for a while instead.

Today’s one of those days. I’m in the middle of another discussion with an atheist, and I just wrote a lengthy response. Now I feel ready to absorb.

What seems remarkable to me is that I don’t feel dried up more often. I’ll chalk that up to God’s gracious mercy. 😉

Published in: on August 28, 2008 at 2:18 pm  Comments (3)  
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CSFF Blog Tour – Broken Angel, Day 3


One of the best parts of this month’s blog tour for Broken Angel, by Sigmund Brouwer, is the discussion of the Church the book has generated. If you haven’t found other blogs besides mine dealing specifically with the subject, you might want to check out Andrea Graham‘s site.

Interestingly, I heard a sermon on the radio this morning, and in passing the pastor mentioned that God alone is the judge of the Church, and that He made some clear pronouncements in the book of Revelation. Here are the things I find God saying in judgment or in warning.

One church left it’s first love.

One church was not to fear what they were about to suffer—testing and tribulation.

Another held to false teaching, compared to the stumbling-block teaching of the prophet Balaam.

A fourth church tolerated a false prophetess who led God’s bond-servants astray so they committed acts of immorality.

A fifth was “dead,” and warned to wake up, strengthen the things that remain, and remember what they had received and heard.

The sixth is commended and rewarded with an open door that no one can shut, but also commanded to hold fast what they had so no one would take their crown.

Lastly, the seventh church is chastised because they are lukewarm, because they think they are rich when in fact they are poor, and think they need nothing when they are actually wretched and miserable and poor and blind and naked. They are warned to buy from Christ “gold refined by fire so that you may become rich, and white garments so that you may clothe yourself, and that the shame of your nakedness will not be revealed; and eye salve to anoint your eyes so that you may see.

The point? These are specific things Christians can pray for the Church and for their local fellowships. The cool thing is, we know exactly what God wants for the Church and what He didn’t want for these seven local bodies. The early chapters in Revelation also record things He commended the churches for. So we can pray with boldness, knowing God’s will in the matter of the Church and in our local assembly. And we know God hears and answers prayer.

Take time to see what others participating this month in CSFF are saying about Broken Angel or the ideas the book generated.

Brandon Barr
Justin Boyer
Keanan Brand
Kathy Brasby
Jackie Castle
Valerie Comer
Karri Compton
Courtney – Book give-away: become eligible to win an autographed copy of Broken Angel by leaving a comment.
CSFF Blog Tour
Stacey Dale
D. G. D. Davidson
Janey DeMeo
Jeff Draper
April Erwin
Karina Fabian
Mark Goodyear
Andrea Graham
Todd Michael Greene
Katie Hart
Timothy Hicks
Christopher Hopper
Joleen Howell
Jason Joyner
Carol Keen
Magma
Margaret
Shannon McNear
Melissa Meeks
Nissa
John W. Otte
Steve Rice
Ashley Rutherford
Hanna Sandvig
Chawna Schroeder
Mirtika or Mir’s Here
Sean Slagle
James Somers
Donna Swanson
Steve Trower
Speculative Faith
Laura Williams
Timothy Wise

Bold font indicates links omitted from the original list;
“√” indicates at least one post available.

Published in: on August 27, 2008 at 11:46 am  Comments (2)  
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CSFF Blog Tour – Broken Angel, Day 2


Yesterday I mentioned themes between the story lines of Sigmund Brouwer‘s Broken Angel. I wrapped up my review by saying this novel is a must read for Christians. I believe that in part because I think the issues raised about the Church are timely and relevant.

One aspect of Broken Angel‘s setting is that a theocracy has developed within the boundaries of the United States. A Christian theocracy, designed to eradicate crime and bring peace and harmony to those living inside the borders of Appalachia, the country within the country. Obviously Appalachia exists with the approval and cooperation of the Outside. Apparently both sides of the cultural wars decided this creation of a theocratic bubble was the best solution to bring an end to divisive wrangling.

Quite soon, however, readers become aware that this theocracy is fraught with problems, one especially egregious issue being that reading has been outlawed and owning books, especially the Bible, is illegal.

At first I thought the view of the Church which Broken Angel offers was too bleak and pessimistic. But later it becomes apparent that the church serving as the underpinning of this theocratic government is not the only church, and certainly not the real Church.

Clearly, Broken Angel induces thought about the Church. So here are some things that came to my mind, in no particular order.

  • Some organizations claim to belong to the church, but they don’t. Rather, they are riddled with false teaching and are mere shadows of the true Bride of Christ.
  • The Church was never designed to exist in a bubble, separated from society at large. How can individual Christians serve as light and salt if we are forced into a cloister away from those who need truth? Jesus said it about his own ministry—He came, not to those who were well, but to those in need of a physician.
  • Living the Christian life isn’t about keeping crime away or creating a peaceful environment for Christians to live in comfort and ease. Whatever social involvement we embrace should be a result of our need to love our neighbors, not a way of selfishly building protection around me and mine.
  • God did not intend for His followers to create His kingdom on earth. That’s something He’ll take care of in His time. Our focus is not to be on political gains or on controlling human institutions. Our mandate is to make disciples. I can’t help but think if we went about making disciples rather than picketing abortion clinics and bartering for prayer in schools or crèches at the mall or the Ten Commandments in the court house, then maybe we wouldn’t have godless judges redefining marriage.
  • From my perspective, we Christians in America lost sight of our first love, and what’s happening in the culture at large is the result. Do we “fix” it by rushing about putting out fires? I think not.
  • The larger issue, then, as I see it, is the need for the Church to act like the Church once again. One tenet of such would be Christians loving each other. Another would be Christians discerning false teaching, and calling it false. Those two things seem contradictory, I know. But I think that’s part of the problem. When held in perfect tension, the Church looks like God intended it to, but when one side or the other receives more weight, the imbalance throws the whole thing off kilter.
  • I’ve actually got more to say on the subject, but this post is already long. And I do want to encourage you to visit other blogs discussing Broken Angel. Mr. Brouwer has graciously stopped by a number of the sites and left comments that reveal his thoughts about the work.

    Brandon Barr
    Justin Boyer
    Keanan Brand
    Kathy Brasby
    Jackie Castle
    Valerie Comer
    Karri Compton
    Courtney – Book give-away: become eligible to win an autographed copy of Broken Angel by leaving a comment.
    CSFF Blog Tour
    Stacey Dale
    D. G. D. Davidson
    Janey DeMeo
    Jeff Draper
    April Erwin
    Karina Fabian
    Mark Goodyear
    Andrea Graham
    Todd Michael Greene
    Katie Hart
    Timothy Hicks
    Christopher Hopper
    Joleen Howell
    Jason Joyner
    Carol Keen
    Magma
    Margaret
    Shannon McNear
    Melissa Meeks
    Nissa
    John W. Otte
    Steve Rice
    Ashley Rutherford
    Hanna Sandvig
    Chawna Schroeder
    Mirtika or Mir’s Here
    Sean Slagle
    James Somers
    Donna Swanson
    Steve Trower
    Speculative Faith
    Laura Williams
    Timothy Wise

    Bold font indicates links omitted from the original list;
    “√” indicates at least one post available.

    Published in: on August 26, 2008 at 12:15 pm  Comments (7)  
    Tags: , , ,

    CSFF Blog Tour – Broken Angel, Day 1


    Broken Angel coverFor August, the CSFF Blog Tour is featuring Sigmund Brouwer‘s adult dystopian science fiction novel Broken Angel. I’ll confess up front that I expected this book to be other than what it is. For one thing, the category listing is “suspense.” With a title like Broken Angel, I assumed “supernatural suspense.” Another Frank Peretti knock off.

    This story is not in a venue even close to supernatural suspense. Since I’ve mentioned more than once that supernatural suspense is not my genre of choice, you might guess that I was pleasantly surprised.

    The Story. Broken Angel is set in a not-too-distant future, in America, or at least a nation within America. Because of how divisive religion became, a theocracy grew up within the borders, walled off from the rest of the country.

    As the story opens, Caitlyn and her papa are on the run, making an effort, the reader soon learns, to return to the outside, primarily so that she won’t fall into the hands of the authorities. Something about her is amiss and soon the reader comes to understand, her life is at risk because whatever happened to form her is of great interest to those now hunting her.

    Strengths. Brouwer’s writing is strong. This is a captivating story, one easy to become engrossed in. The world seems real, even plausible. The characters are engaging, with admirable qualities that had me rooting for them from the start. There are surprises along the way, but not ones that seem inconsistent or outlandish. The pace is fast but still allows the reader to get to know the characters.

    Weakness. There is one element that seems somewhat predictable. For me it in no way spoiled the story. Mostly I wondered how it came about, not what it actually was. I also wondered what was to become of this element, and that was actually not clear. Is that a weakness? For some people it might be. Some like neat, complete resolutions. The end of this story was more like a beginning. Not that I thought there was any indication a sequel was on the horizon. I could be wrong about that, but rather, the end of Broken Angel felt like the reader was free to postulate what might happen next. Not a weakness, as I see it, but something a reader might like to know going in, so that his expectations stay in check.

    Themes. Here’s where I really connected with this novel. I felt like there were bold statements about the world between the lines of a well-told story. Some of you may remember when I introduced Book Buzz Tag, I listed Broken Angel as a Must Read. I did so primarily because I think Christians should think about and discuss the issues this novel brings up. I plan to do that during the next couple days.

    Recommendation. Must read for Christians. This is a story non-Christians could also enjoy, but I think someone who does not have faith in Christ might come to some erroneous conclusions about Christianity and the Church.

    And now, others blogging about Broken Angel during our three-day tour:

    Brandon Barr
    Justin Boyer
    Keanan Brand
    Jackie Castle
    Valerie Comer
    Karri Compton
    Courtney
    CSFF Blog Tour
    Stacey Dale
    D. G. D. Davidson
    Janey DeMeo
    Jeff Draper
    April Erwin
    Karina Fabian
    Mark Goodyear
    Andrea Graham
    Katie Hart
    Timothy Hicks
    Christopher Hopper
    Joleen Howell
    Jason Joyner
    Carol Keen
    Magma
    Margaret
    Shannon McNear
    Melissa Meeks
    Nissa
    John W. Otte
    Steve Rice
    Ashley Rutherford
    Hanna Sandvig
    Chawna Schroeder
    Mirtika or Mir’s Here
    Sean Slagle
    James Somers
    Donna Swanson
    Steve Trower
    Speculative Faith
    Laura Williams
    Timothy Wise

    Bold font indicates links omitted from the original list;
    “√” indicates at least one post available.

    Fantasy Friday (Posted Saturday) – The Best Bookstore


    It felt like a fantasy. There I stood, in a Christian bookstore, with a fiction shelf extending across three aisles. All the books were face out except some multiple copies. And the capper—the books were organized according to genre, with Fantasy/Futuristic/Allegory one of the categories.

    Pinch me. Was it real? You can see it for yourself, if you’re in the Los Angeles area. The bookstore is Lighthouse Christian Store (3008 N Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90808, phone 562-425-1211).

    As if to bring me back to reality, about half the store carries gift items, cards, and apparel, but as you can see by the name, it is not pretending to be an exclusive bookstore. Nevertheless, I think this development—a store that thinks enough of Christian fiction to sort the books by categories—is a positive sign.

    And even more so is the inclusion of Fantasy as part of the name for the “speculative” category. Of course, this left Austin Boyd’s Mars Hill Classified science fiction trilogy to be shelved with the suspense/mystery books. But then Robin Parrish‘s superhero books (latest release, Merciless, Bethany House) were there as well. However, that’s by publisher’s choice, since BHP markets those as suspense, not fantasy.

    I was gratified to see all the best fantasy authors represented, though Bryan Polivka‘s books were sadly misplaced. Somehow, someone thought The Trophy Chase Trilogy, with a first book entitled The Legend of the Firefish, belonged in the Contemporary Fiction section. 😮

    But I’m not complaining. I was thoroughly delighted to see Auralia’s Colors (Jeffrey Overstreet, WaterBrook), The DragonKeeper Chronicles (Donita Paul, WaterBrook), The Return of the Guardian King (Karen Hancock, Bethany House) two of the Swords of Lyric series (Sharon Hinck, NavPress), and others all collected in one location.

    The books for youth didn’t fare quite as well. The placement was odd for one thing—sandwiched between the books for toddlers and the DVD’s for pre-schoolers. The selection wasn’t great, just half a section of shelves. Wayne Batson (The Door Within Trilogy, The Isle of Fire, and The Isle of the Sword; Thomas Nelson) had the best display (of course his books have those beautiful covers, so I guess that’s not a surprise). Other fantasies were there, too: Andrew Peterson‘s On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness, Bryan Davis‘s Eye of the Oracle, and a number of the Landon Snow books by R. K. Mortenson. Since it seems so many of the new fantasies coming out are aimed at middle grade or young adult readers, I guess that small selection was the biggest surprise to me.

    Still, I came away from that bookstore feeling happy that Christian fantasy has taken another step forward.

    Why Do They DO That?


    OK, this is a rant. Fair warning.

    Of late, I’ve been asking myself the “Why do they DO that?” question more and more. Seems like there is less and less “common” sense going around.

    Take NBC and the Olympics coverage. How many times do they tell us they are giving us live coverage of this or that event? Except they delay the feed to the West Coast and, I presume, to the Mountain Time Zone, as well. Rather than watching true live coverage from 5 PM to 9 or 10, no. We on the West Coast must wait until 8:00 and either stay up late, tape (and watch the next day—a 24-hour delay), or miss the “live coverage” completely. Why do that DO that?

    Or take the oil companies, who did—to the extreme—their annual price hike. First gas at the pump skyrockets to the point that consumers actually start to do something, then the prices plunge, but never quite to pre-rocket levels. Yet there’s a collective sigh of relief from drivers who are now saddled with a significant increase in price from the previous year. All the while, the oil execs rack up huge salaries and stock holders rake in untold profits. All this, despite the fact that America went through gas rationing and long lines at the pump back in the 70’s. We’ve known for 30 years that being at the mercy of foreign interests when it comes to a vital resource such as oil leads eventually to trouble. So where are the electric cars and hybrids? Still on the fringe? Why didn’t the car manufactures DO something to prepare for this eventuality?

    Then there’s the “fair and balanced reporting” of any network on the current presidential candidates. One will be featured with a pithy sound bite, backdropped by cheering, smiling faces and lots of handshakes. And the other is captured in a clip commenting about the first candidate, with no audience response, in fact, with no audience—as if the speech was delivered from an empty studio. Or how about the pictures of Unpopular Political Figure? Always the person is in mid-sentence, making his facial expression appear somewhat dopey. Whereas Popular Political Figure has a picture making him look especially young and handsome. Perfect propaganda procedures, which I was taught to recognized way back when the Communists were the ones who used such tactics. Why do we put up with this in America?

    The writing community is not without our share of people who inspire the question. Some people in the business treat every piece of correspondence, every personal contact, every discussion board post as a commercial. Sure, buried in there somewhere might be the information you’re looking for … if you can keep reading beyond the self-serving content. But the overall effect is to leave a bad, bad taste. So why do they DO that?

    Published in: on August 21, 2008 at 12:21 pm  Comments (6)  
    Tags: ,

    Kidz Book Buzz – Jimmy Stars, Day 3


    Are kids’ books just for kids?

    Hardly. Yet many adults distain reading children’s literature. I can only speculate as to the reasons. Perhaps because of the child protagonist, perhaps because of the coming of age nature of so many of the stories. Perhaps the plots seem too simple or too straightforward.

    Yet great children’s books are among the classics. Parents who read to their children often discover these great stories first, then spread the wealth to their friends. Teachers, too, and librarians mine the gold in these great books.

    For those resistant to children’s literature on principle, it might be helpful to point out some of the strengths of the best kids’ books.

    First, the really good kids’ book have universal themes, something that is certainly true about Mary Ann Rodman’s Jimmy’s Stars, the debut feature of Children’s Book Blog Tour, set up by Kidz Book Buzz. Death, promise keeping, war, sacrificial suffering—these themes in Jimmy’s Stars are timeless and timely. They are important for adults to think about as much as for middle graders.

    Second, the really good kids’ books have really good characters, including the adults of the story. Since all adults were once kids, there ought to be elements of the kid characters that remind an adult reader of what they once thought or what their own growing up process entailed. They can also view the interaction of the young characters with the adults through the eyes of the children—always informative.

    The adult characters in Jimmy’s Stars are the perfect example of well-written adult characters in a children’s book. Including hero Jimmy, they were written in such a believable way—shown as the child point-of-view character saw them, but with enough action to let the adult reader realize the child was an unreliable narrator. What Ellie saw was not the whole story about these adults. Toots wasn’t just boisterous and aggressive. Jimmy wasn’t just attentive to Ellie. Miss Granberry wasn’t out of touch with her students.

    In addition, well-written adult characters make choices that impacted the children. This in itself is a reason for adults to read children’s literature. It is never a bad thing to be reminded that children are people, that they listen and learn from adults, even when adults are just being themselves and not trying to make an impression.

    Which leads to the next point. Even adults who have already come of age can learn, grow, and change. In fact, I tend to think learning is a hallmark of life.

    Two quotes from Jimmy’s Stars: “P.S. Don’t forget to let the joy out.”
    There are worse things than dying, Jimmy had said. Like not really living while you are alive.

    There’s something to think about, something to learn from. Was Jimmy right to think that living is letting the joy out? Or might living be letting the learning in?

    Take some time to see what others are saying about Jimmy’s Stars.

    01 Charger, A Childhood of Dreams, A Mom Speaks, All About Children’s Books, Becky’s Book Reviews, Book Review Maniac, By the Book Reviews, Dolce Bellezza, Fireside Musings, Homeschool Buzz, Looking Glass Reviews, Maggie Reads, Maw Books, Small World Reads, The Friendly Book Nook

    Kidz Book Buzz – Jimmy Stars, Day 2


    Mary Ann RodmanAs part of the Children’s Book Blog Tour set up by Kidz Book Buzz, I want to continue discussing Mary Ann Rodman‘s fine middle grade historical novel, Jimmy Stars. Yesterday in my recommendation, I had this to say about Jimmy Stars:

    This book brings up some important issues, ones that adults will do well to discuss with their children, and this book gives the perfect forum for such a discussion.

    Interestingly, in her comment to that post Sally mentioned the topic of war. Another reviewer mentioned how timely this book was, referring to the suffering war causes. Even the endorsement blurb from Library Journal says “This psychological, child-oriented war perspective could provide significance in today’s military dilemma.”

    I was a little startled. Yes, the story takes place during World War II, and attitudes about war may be drawn, but I didn’t see the story tackling that subject. (Note: the rest of this post contains spoilers.) Rather, I thought the story took on two other important issues: the promises adults make to children and don’t keep, and death.

    First the promises issue. I thought Rodman did a masterful job portraying a child’s perspective. Clearly, the protagonist, sixth grader Ellie, took some things as promises that were intended to offer her hope and consolation. Instead, the empty words brought an extra dose of bitterness.

    Towards the end, I didn’t think Rodman would bring resolution to this theme, but she did, masterfully. In a letter, Jimmy explains to Ellie why he made the promises. Her coming to understand this is a major part of her coming of age. From Jimmy’s letter:

    I know I promised that nothing would happen to me. I shouldn’t have done that. Some promises are not ours to make. Sometimes you go ahead and make them anyway and hope for the best. You don’t want the people you love to worry. I’m sorry, [Ellie].

    The other issue is death. Rodman actually walks Ellie through the various stages of grief: denial, anger, resignation, determination to keep the memory of the loved one alive. Again, these points were a natural part of the story, not in anyway forced.

    However, it is here I think parents should also be reading this book in order to discuss the subject of death with their middle grader.

    Ellie came to a point of hope because she learned how many other people loved Jimmy, because she determined to keep his memory alive in her heart, and ultimately because she came to embrace the creed he lived by: finding the joy. In his letter, he told her that there are worse things than dying, like not really living while you are alive.

    These are all fine points. A number of other reviewers even commented on the book ending in hope, and it did that. But from a Christian worldview, it is an incomplete hope, a temporary hope.

    Am I suggesting the end should have been different? Not at all. I do think, however, parents should use the occasion of reading this book to discuss eternal hope with their children as well.

    And now, I’ll let you see what others on the tour are saying. I know several have interviews with Ms. Rodman, so you won’t want to miss them.

    01 Charger, A Childhood of Dreams, A Mom Speaks, All About Children’s Books, Becky’s Book Reviews, Book Review Maniac, By the Book Reviews, Dolce Bellezza, Fireside Musings, Homeschool Buzz, Looking Glass Reviews, Maggie Reads, Maw Books, Small World Reads, The Friendly Book Nook

    Kidz Book Buzz – Jimmy’s Stars


    Jimmy's Stars coverI’m not a children’s writer, but because I worked with kids for so long—as an English teacher, no less—I care a lot about the books that are out there for middle graders and young adults. Happily, there’s a new blog tour, hosted by Kidz Book Buzz that features books for that age group.

    The inaugural tour starts today. The Children’s Book Blog Tour is highlighting Mary Ann Rodman’s middle grade historical, a coming of age story entitled Jimmy’s Stars.

    The Story. Jimmy’s Stars takes place in the US during World War II. The protagonist is a sixth grade girl named Ellie whose only brother is drafted late in the war. She is his favorite, it would appear, and her life is definitely entwined with his. Consequently, his leaving to join the war effort as a medic upsets her world.

    Strengths. Rodman creates vivid, believable, interesting characters. Oddly enough she does this with “ordinary” people. Her characters are average people in small-town America. They go to school, pick out Christmas trees, can tomatoes, and come together as a community when tragedy hits anyone in the neighborhood. This is not a romanticized view. Instead, Rodman makes the ordinary aspects of these characters’ lives seem interesting and at times monumental.

    Weaknesses. I’m not a big fan of coming of age stories. In some ways this one feels predictable. However, for a middle grader who hasn’t read a host of other coming of age stories, I think this will ring true. Ellie learns some valuable, though painful truths that will resonate with people in the target age group.

    Observations. It would be natural for visitors here at A Christian Worldview of Fiction to assume that I am only reviewing books that are Christian fiction. That’s not the case. I talk a lot about Christian fiction and about Christianity, but in the end, I want to look at all fiction, informed by the Christian worldview.

    All that to say, Jimmy’s Stars is set in a time period and in a location that made Christianity the accepted and expected religion. Consequently, there are numerous references to things like going to church and praying. But when it comes to the big issues, the central themes (which I’ll look at in my posts the next couple days), there isn’t a uniquely Christian approach. Which is fine, but necessary for visitors here to know before I give my recommendation.

    Recommendation. I highly recommend Jimmy’s Stars for middle grade readers, and their parents. This book brings up some important issues, ones that adults will do well to discuss with their children and this book gives the perfect forum for such a discussion. Jimmy’s Stars is entertaining, too, and that’s the best kind of book to give a middle grader.

    Take a few moments to check out what other bloggers on the tour are saying:

    01 Charger, A Childhood of Dreams, A Mom Speaks, All About Children’s Books, Becky’s Book Reviews, Book Review Maniac, By the Book Reviews, Dolce Bellezza, Fireside Musings, Homeschool Buzz, Looking Glass Reviews, Maggie Reads, Maw Books, Small World Reads, The Friendly Book Nook

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