CBBT – Wayfarer by R. J. Anderson, Day 1

Here’s Post #2 for today, my contribution to the Children’s Book Blog Tour featuring Wayfarer, R. J. Anderson‘s sequel to Faery Rebel: Spell Hunter, (HarperCollins). I already know, any CSFF Blog Tour participants who see this post will be jealous because I’ve had a chance to read Anderson’s second book (which just released this week) because the first one was so popular with those who recently reviewed it.

I’m happy to say, Wayfarer doesn’t suffer a sophomore jinx like so many second books do. The story continues what the first one started and is as exciting and full of suspense, intrigue, twists, and truth as its predecessor.

I’ll admit, the US cover (pictured above, on the right—the other is the UK version) threw me. During the CSFF Blog Tour for Anderson’s debut novel, a number of reviewers commented on the pixy-like image on the cover, reminiscent of Tinkerbell (you can see that cover pictured here). Since that image fit what I thought of in connection to faeries, I wasn’t troubled. But this more adult, prim and proper version pictured on the cover of Wayfarer was a little off-putting.

Then I started reading. After the short prologue I discovered this story was as much a boy’s story as it was a faery’s. And, quite frankly, in the early going, I missed Knife (the main character in the first book).

But all these concerns led to nothing. I soon forgot about the girlie-girl cover and came to care for Timothy as I delved into the fast-paced, fun story that pushes the reader to think more deeply about … a variety of things—home, family, trust, selfishness, sacrifice, kindness, truthfulness, courage. There’s a LOT in this enjoyable story.

Plus, in a crucial place, Knife stepped up to be … Knife, which added to my delight. The character I’d grown to love in the last book wasn’t just a place holder or window dressing, even though Wayfarer wasn’t her story. She played a significant role, and I loved this book more because of it.

But there was lots to love about this story for itself. While I didn’t lose my attachment to Knife (and in fact actually felt more fond of her than ever), I quickly came to care about Linden and Timothy.

Wayfarer is its own story, not a repeat of the earlier book. The characters were unique, the conflict ratcheted higher, and the effects spread wider with more at stake. In other words, this story felt bigger, more complex.

But enough of my introduction.

Take a look at what other Children’s Book Blog Tour participants have to say about Wayfarer:

Special thanks to HarperTeen, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, for supplying me with a review copy of Wayfarer.

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3 Comments

  1. Becky,

    NO FAIR! Or should it be No Faerie? Bad bad bad bad bad…
    ;-)

  2. :) I didn’t even think about the fact all those people on your tour, even the manly men, were going to be jealous.

  3. Yeah, this is one that CSFF participants were excited about, right Krysti? I’m hoping we can still tour it, but I don’t know if or when.

    The manly-men just may have to buy a copy of Wayfarer for their daughter or granddaughter or neighbor across the street—anyone, just as long as they get to read it first. :-D

    Becky


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